UMBC Biology Council of Majors

Click here to edit subtitle

News

Blood test with potential to detect all cancers

Posted by BioCoM Executive Account on August 16, 2014 at 5:30 PM

Scientists from the University of Bradford claim to have developed a blood test that can detect any type of cancer. The technique involves damaging the DNA of white blood cells with ultraviolet light.


The DNA in the blood of patients with melanoma, colon, lung cancer, etc. is more easily damaged than healthy patients. Therefore, the test looks to see if there is a pre-cancerous intermediate level of damage to compare; thereby, alluding to cancer. If it works, it could be a way to test for cancers without being as costly and invasive as colonoscopies and biopsies.


However, Prof. Diana Anderson, who led the research, said that the study has very significant limitations. So far they have only tested it with the three cancers mentioned above, but the results have been enough to cause excitement. Further experiments need to be done in order to see if this test can work for other types of cancer.


Hughes, Dominic. "Cancer Blood Test Moves Step Closer." BBC News. BBC, 26 July 2014. Web. 16 Aug. 2014.


Anderson, Diana. "Sensitivity and Specificity of the Empirical Lymphocyte Genome Sensitivity (LGS) Assay: Implications for Improving Cancer Diagnostics." Sensitivity and Specificity of the Empirical Lymphocyte Genome Sensitivity (LGS) Assay: Implications for Improving Cancer Diagnostics. The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, 30 June 2014. Web. 16 Aug. 2014.

 

Categories: Health News

Post a Comment

Oops!

Oops, you forgot something.

Oops!

The words you entered did not match the given text. Please try again.

Already a member? Sign In

0 Comments